All posts tagged: Advice

Announcing the Launch of the Colburn Fortissima Project!

On Saturday, the Colburn office of Community Engagement and Career Development will launch the Fortissima Fellowship. Designed and implemented by Jazmín Morales, Fortissima is an artistic and leadership development fellowship for young women of color in classical music. The program provides private instruction and leadership development training to a cohort of young women of color with high ability on their instrument and an interest in pursuing a career in music. The program will bridge gaps in the pipeline of music training by providing critical tools that are otherwise inaccessible to many young women of color studying music — specifically, private instruction, which can be extremely cost prohibitive even for middle class families, and leadership development training, which is often overlooked, yet imperative for young artists of color who have to advocate strongly for themselves in order to succeed — so that they may thrive in a competitive environment like a collegiate conservatory of music, and eventually, a professional orchestra. Fortissima fits well with the programmatic offerings currently offered at Colburn. For the past six years, …

Financial Stability: What is an hour of your time actually worth?

One of the biggest challenges you will face as an artist is attaining financial stability. It is very possible to find financial stability, but nobody seems to share strategies for thinking about how you go about developing a sustainable career. The Challenge I get it. I know that quite often, you find ourself taking work that is both artistically and financially beneath you, which is frustrating because it takes you away from the work in which you are most passionate. The result is that often, your art becomes uninspiring and unfulfilling. Instead of blindly taking every opportunity that comes your way, the challenge is to crunch the numbers and set some basic limits to what you will and won’t take. Let’s dig in a little on some strategies you can use as you work to establish the value of an hour of your time. Process In this world, knowledge is power. I’ve created this spreadsheet to help you out. Click on the link to create a side by side comparison of your jobs, including all artistic and non-artistic …

Launching a new ensemble, organization, or business? Read this, Part III. Developing your Concept.

For the past few days, I’ve written a step by step process for how I would go about launching a new ensemble, organization, or business. Today, I’m going to give you some thoughts on how to develop that great idea you came up with during the first two posts. Continue divergent thinking and brainstorming. Now that you have gathered a few good ideas to pursue, brainstorm ways you can develop a solution to your idea or the beginnings of a vision for your ensemble. Continue to think broadly, but begin to strategize how you can create tangible, achievable goals to meet the need or demand you are addressing.  Tip: Think of specific benchmarks over the next year to help you develop and achieve your idea. Think about 3 month, six month and twelve month goals.  Now that you have a few ideas in which to pursue, it’s time to see how your network responds to the concept.  Tip: Do not be afraid of someone else stealing your idea. The information you get from asking what your network thinks …

The Long Tail Sessions, Vol. V—Jonathan Kuuskoski interview and some great tools of the trade, and an amazing playlist.

Hi everyone! This week, I decided to include a short interview with Jonathan Kuuskoski, who currently serves as the Interim Chair of the Department of Entrepreneurship & Leadership (EXCEL) and Director of the EXCEL Lab at the University of Michigan School of Music Theatre and Dance. Here is the interview: I’m also happy to share my weekly Long Tail Session, which includes recommendations from Jonathan. Here are the show notes Jonathan and I spoke about in the video. Here are the show notes. Link to Volume V of the Long Tail Sessions: Link to the Khemia Ensemble. Link to Asana, a free task management tool for your team. Art Thinking: How to Carve Out Creative Space in a World of Schedules, Budgets, and Bosses by Amy Whitacre. About The Long Tail Sessions: Last winter, I traveled from LA to NYC on a Virgin America flight and loved that the in-flight entertainment featured musicians in alphabetical order. At first, I found it jarring to see Beethoven next to the Beatles, but then I thought “Of course they’re featured side-by-side, …

Climbing the Ladder: Majoring in Music As A Pathway To College and Upward Mobility.

A couple of weeks ago, I published this post, which encourages applied university teachers to broaden the definition of success for their students. It is our responsibility to redefine success for all of our students at the earliest age. If you are part of a middle or high school based music program, an El Sistema inspired program or have a private studio, you have likely been approached by students or their parents about whether or not majoring in music is a good idea. I believe we should encourage any student who is interested in dedicating themselves deeply to the art form to major in music. The value of their degree is not necessarily in earning a specific major, it’s in earning a degree itself.  My argument is that ANY degree helps a student become upwardly mobile in our society. Here’s a quick video that discusses upward mobility in this country. The entire video is mind-blowing but in particular check out the 2:52 mark. Who goes to college: I did some quick (Google) research on our population …