All posts tagged: work life balance

Career Strategy: When does your art become a hobby?

The movie Moneyball is solidly on my list of top ten baseball movies of all time (behind Field of Dreams, and The Natural, of course) One of my favorite quotes in the movie comes when a baseball scout talks to Billy Beane about the moment a baseball player is told to hang up their uniform. Here’s the clip from the movie, followed by the quote: Scout: “We’re all told at some point in time that we can no longer play the children’s game, we just don’t…we don’t know when that’s gonna be. Some of us are told at eighteen, some of us are told at forty, but we’re all told.” Instead of the above quote referring to the game of baseball, what if it was referring to our careers as artists? So often, we let others dictate our path instead of identifying the path we were meant to take ourselves. While sage wisdom from our mentors, family, and friends are necessary for us to see the bigger picture, the key here is that we are the only ones who …

Ten Steps to a Personal Strategy Statement

Yesterday, I wrote about the steps I was compelled to take in my career to develop a better work/life balance for myself. The post contained big picture thoughts on how to make change in your life and career. Today’s post provides 10 steps to help you develop your own personal strategy statement: Sit with a friend and come up with a list of the top 10 aspects of your career and life that are most important to you. For example, my family is really important to me, as is my work empowering individuals to find success so both would be on my top 10. It’s really important to have another person do this with you as they will often hear different values than you think you’re conveying. Goal: Ten career and life goals. No more, no less. Identify 5 individuals that are 5 years ahead of you who you admire in your professional field. Document their careers based on your ten goals. Goal: To compare and contrast things that are of value to you.  Take your ten …

Career Strategy for Artists

In 2010, I had the dream.  My wife and I owned a house and had recently welcomed our first child into the world. In addition, my work life was great. I had a tenure track position teaching bassoon at Bowling Green State University where I worked with a full studio of lovely students, I was performing regularly in two regional orchestras and my work as an instructor within the entrepreneurship program at the institution allowed me to create new career pathways for students from across the campus. Everything was perfect. Except it wasn’t. I was completely burnt out, tired from being stretched too thin, and not bringing my best to my work or my art. I knew I needed a change but was honestly lost because it was difficult for me to imagine leaving a career that so many people in my field were striving to achieve. My work/life balance was way out of sync, which meant that I wasn’t able to be present for my family, nor was I able to bring my best …

Career planning for artists: Why a three year plan of action is the new ten.

What do you see yourself doing in five to ten years? That’s a big, important, overwhelming question. In my experience, five to ten years is too long of a runway to come up with a concrete plan of action. Think about all of the things you’ve done over the last five to ten years. You’ve likely had some major life changes in that time. Planning that far into the future isn’t really a productive exercise in our fast paced world. When I advise artists, instead of asking them to map out the next ten years, I ask them to picture their ideal career in three years. Three years gives my clients enough time and space to think about what they want to do, come up with a plan, and act on it. Here are some steps you can take to come up with a strategic plan for your life and career: Forget the pathways that have been prescribed to you — To start any strategic planning process, I always encourage artists to consider the variety of …

Announcing the Launch of the Colburn Fortissima Project!

On Saturday, the Colburn office of Community Engagement and Career Development will launch the Fortissima Fellowship. Designed and implemented by Jazmín Morales, Fortissima is an artistic and leadership development fellowship for young women of color in classical music. The program provides private instruction and leadership development training to a cohort of young women of color with high ability on their instrument and an interest in pursuing a career in music. The program will bridge gaps in the pipeline of music training by providing critical tools that are otherwise inaccessible to many young women of color studying music — specifically, private instruction, which can be extremely cost prohibitive even for middle class families, and leadership development training, which is often overlooked, yet imperative for young artists of color who have to advocate strongly for themselves in order to succeed — so that they may thrive in a competitive environment like a collegiate conservatory of music, and eventually, a professional orchestra. Fortissima fits well with the programmatic offerings currently offered at Colburn. For the past six years, …