All posts tagged: finding balance

What is an hour of your time actually worth from a Work Life Balance Perspective?

It’s a funny thing, time. We never seem to have enough of it, especially when pursuing an art form that is defined by a fleeting moment in our lives. One minute we’re on stage pouring our heart out for an audience, the next, we’re on the way home, thinking about the next performance. Our work leading to that intensive moment of artistic output causes us to value the time we have even more deeply. Hours and hours of work for a performance, and then it’s over as quickly as it began. Earlier this week, I wrote about strategies to determine the value of an hour of your time, but thinking about your work from a financial prospective is only one part of defining that value. Part of the reason so many artists face burn out in their playing is that, often, they wind up in situations that are not artistically satisfying. Compound that with the fact that it takes them away from family, friends and time for themselves, and the work becomes infinitely more frustrating. …

Strategies to help Artists take some time for themselves.

As many of you know, I’ve been doing a bit of writing lately in an attempt to help all of you find balance between work and being able to take a breath and enjoy life. Yesterday, I read this amazing post by Eric Perry. The post, titled “How to have healthy alone time,” discusses the value and strategies for taking time to be by yourself, which really resonated with me. I’m a pretty outgoing person and enjoy the company of others. Until recently, I assumed that meant I was an extrovert. Then, I took the Myers Briggs Test, and one of the questions went something like this: “Are you energized by large groups of people, or do you get your energy by being alone.” It took me less than a second to determine that I get my energy by being alone. Perhaps this has to do with the fact that I spent decades of my life alone in a practice room pursuing an unattainable art form, but likely it’s built into my DNA. Since this realization, …

Are you an artist looking for a way to find balance? Stop letting EMAIL run your life!

Often, I find myself buried in email with no end in site. I set aside time to dig out, only to be inundated by more emails. Email has been one of the biggest challenges to finding balance in my life. Here are some suggestions about how to handle your email: Tackle email after you get your big thing out of the way–Practicing, having time to think, or planning a new project are WAY more important and energizing. If you start with the black hole of email, chances are, you could spend your entire allotted time for big picture things responding to email. Action: Look at your calendar and block off a two hour block each day before you open your email in order to tackle big things you’d like to accomplish.  Schedule a time to check email–Check your email only AFTER you tackle your big thing for the day and keep yourself to a tight schedule for reading and responding. Generally, I check my email in late morning and mid-afternoon. Otherwise, I try to stay away. Action: Block …

Trying to find balance as an Artist? Stop taking every gig that comes your way!

We’ve all done it. We’ve taken that gig that seemed like a great idea six months ago. Now, we find ourselves sitting in traffic much like the photo above, wondering why we made the decision in the first place. Yesterday, I wrote this post about how artists could find balance using Pareto’s Principle, also known as the 80-20 rule.  In it’s purest form, the 80-20 rule makes good sense. Unfortunately, when it comes to gigs, we often toss in other variables, like the desire to make great art and the fear that your phone may not ring the next time around if you turn something down. Too many of us are blindly taking gigs and not thinking about balance. Here are some thoughts as you consider your work: All gigs are not created equal. Don’t take every gig that comes your way.  I often hear from people that the most frustrating gigs are the engagements that are artistically compromising.Action: Stop participating in gigs that are artistically compromising and spend that time practicing, reading, learning, or being …