All posts tagged: arts administration

How I Think about Programmatic Excellence at Colburn

Last week, I wrote this post about ways to tip the scales towards programmatic excellence. Here are five reflections on how I set up programming at Colburn: Give your program time. I was fortunate to be given a year to identify the needs of the Los Angeles community and see how Colburn was best suited to help. Tip: Start by developing a strategy for your organization. You will move faster when you have an institution-wide vision for your program.   Connect the dots. When I arrived at Colburn, I noticed that we had a few broad-based programs that provided very nice experiences for students and faculty, but didn’t produce the deep engagement present in our other school divisions. The sequential learning necessary for deep engagement simply wasn’t there. There was a lot of pride in preexisting programming (some programs had be going on for decades). I worked to honor those programs by pairing them with new programming that provided deep engagement for interested students. Tip: There is often pride of and sensitivity about preexisting programming when new initiatives start. Instead of cancelling …

Back to the Future for Orchestra Musicians?

Now that we’re well into the summer months, I thought I’d take a moment to see what people are writing about in the orchestra world.  Here’s an excerpt from an article I found: The situation of the symphony musician in the United States today is reflective of the somewhat tenuous economic status of symphonic music as an art form offering meaningful aesthetic experience to a limited public.  The symphony musician is caught between the potent forces of general public apathy, a management dominated labor market, and a union that in someways works against his best interests.  To these may be added the effects of a recording industry over which he has little control and which offers him only short-term rewards while extracting long-term profits.  From the disjunction of his social position as a dependent craftsman and his idealized self-image as a gifted and highly skilled artist emerge problems of reconciliation of his social and aesthetic expectations with the realities of his occupational life.  Strong commitments to the values of art and his chosen profession, essential …