All posts filed under: Primary Menu

Launching a new ensemble, organization, or business? Read this, Part IV.

This is step 4 of a series of posts designed to help you launch a new ensemble, organization, or business. Before you read this post, make sure you start with this post, followed by this post, and this post. Here are some steps to help you research and identify the resources necessary to launch your idea. One of the most important aspects of launching a new venture is to think deeply about the resources you will need to launch your idea. There are three recommended steps to this part of the process: Research—Seek out online resources, books, and interviews with successful individuals who have experience doing similar work to the new venture you’d like to launch. Tip: When conducting research, focus on the over arching conceptual of what is being said instead of specific venture being covered; you will discover that knowledge, in any form, can be applicable if applied correctly—even from a seemingly unrelated subject matter. Recommended Resources: Pat Flynn The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses Business Model …

How to set a budget as an artist.

Earlier this week, I wrote about the frustrations of setting a personal budget. Here is a step by step process for budgeting as an artist. Rules of Engagement:  Knowledge is power — Understanding where you spend your money from month to month is the only way you will be able to find financial stability in the long run. Tip: Look your spending habits in the eye and come up with a strategy for your financial future. Develop a habit — Like remembering to brush your teeth every day, good budgeting comes when you set time aside to take stock of your spending. My wife and I usually talk about our family budget over a glass of wine once a week for thirty minutes and I keep an eye on our finances every day for about 10 minutes.  That’s all it takes. Budget even when finances are in good shape — One of the biggest mistakes artists make is that when they get an extra gig or project, they spend the extra income that month, which is …

Long Tail Sessions, Vol. VII—Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Today’s mix features two musical greats who, unfortunately, passed away this week. Gorde Downe and Fats Domino were amazing artists that leave an incredible legacy! I’m also sharing one of the best covers I’ve ever heard, Joni Mitchell covering her own song Both Sides Now, decades after she released the original recording of the song. Both Sides Now was already one of my all time favorite tunes, and this rendition tops the original. Hope you enjoy!   About The Long Tail Sessions: Last winter, I traveled from LA to NYC on a Virgin America flight and loved that the in-flight entertainment featured musicians in alphabetical order. At first, I found it jarring to see Beethoven next to the Beatles, but then I thought “Of course they’re featured side-by-side, that’s how we enjoy music these days.” With this in mind, I’m pleased to present a weekly series of playlists dedicated to those of us who are not genre specific in our listening habits. Just as your listening habits have changed dramatically over the past 20 years, so have the ways musicians …

The reason why higher education values time served rather than competency.

I remember vividly, my undergraduate degree. Semester after semester, I took 20+ credits, balancing private lessons with ensemble work, education courses, and my general studies. On top of that, I worked as an RA and held a few odd jobs over my time in school in order to make ends meet. The accumulation of work often buried me so deeply that I remember finishing each semester feeling like I had made it through the race but didn’t really have anything of quality to show for the work. One of the biggest reasons many of us are over stretched during college is that higher education values the amount of time we are physically in a classroom, rather than our ability to show competency. In Cracking The Credit Hour, Amy Laitinen takes an objective look at the state of higher education. This is a must read for all and here are a few takeaways from the report: The Credit Hour—the unit of measurement that determines competency for college students—was developed in 1906 by Andrew Carnegie. The reason for this …

The Frustration of Personal Budgeting.

It can be incredibly frustrating to hear someone give you advice on your finances. Although well intentioned, the solution often floated is that you simply need to live within your means in order to find financial stability. Of course this makes sense, however, the problem is that many of us don’t have enough working cash flow in order to make ends meet. In this scenario, this advice becomes frustrating at best, insulting at worst. To be clear, I do believe that budgeting is the best strategy to finding financial freedom, however, it’s not as simple as someone waving a magic “manage your finances and all will be well,” wand. Here are some strategies to help you figure out the steps to finding financial stability. Set a budget: Knowledge is power and a well thought out budget will help you think about how much you’re spending each months. The more important aspect of your budget is how much you’re making. Understanding your income and where it comes from is incredibly important. Tip: I highly recommend You Need A Budget. Check …